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Women's History Month

March is Women's History Month. This collection explores the contribution of diverse women to culture, science, politics and society.

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Elizabeth Keckly: From Slavery to the White House
She was enslaved at birth – but became the first lady’s favorite dressmaker and the author of a sensational memoir that shocked the nation. So who was Elizabeth Keckly?
Rachel Carson's Fight for the Environment
Marine biologist and writer Rachel Carson demanded that the US government take responsibility to protect people and the planet. Her book Silent Spring was a turning point in the modern environmental movement.
Stepping Forward: The Fight for College Integration
For Autherine Lucy and Pollie Anne Myers, trying to get an education was an act of courage in itself.
Students and the Struggle for School Integration
The story of Barbara Johns and her fellow students fight for school integration resulting in the successful case - Brown v. Board of Education.
Barbara Jordan: The Black Texan Politician who Broke the Glass Ceiling
At a time when women and people of colour were all but excluded from the US government, one woman stormed the corridors of power and made them her own. This is the story of Barbara Jordan, the African American from the South who defied expectations by being selected to serve in Congress and who became one of the finest legislators in US history.
Virginia Hall: Nazi Nemesis
They called her the Limping Lady. The Allied spy who topped the Nazis’ most wanted list. This is the story of Virginia Hall – one of the most decorated special agents of the Second World War.
Madam Queenie: New York's Notorious Crime Boss
America has always been captivated by crime and the sharp-dressed, trigger happy men who dominate the underworld. But one story remains criminally neglected, that of gambling kingpin Stephanie St. Clair, aka Madame Queenie - the Robin Hood of Harlem.
Nelly Bly: Breaking Barriers from Asylums to the Skies
We've all got our favourite YouTubers, right? But everyone with a channel has this Pennsylvian lady, Nellie Bly, to thank. You could say she was the world’s first blogger.
Hedy Lamarr: Mother of WiFi
Did you know? The amazing technology behind Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and GPS was the brainchild of Hollywood actor turned visionary inventor Hedy Lamarr - the Mother of Wi-Fi.
Ethel Payne: First Lady of the Black Press
As the First Lady of the Black Press, Ethel Payne wielded her first amendment right to ask the tough questions and hold those in power to account.
Patsy Mink: Changing the Rules
The first Asian American woman ever to be elected to Congress, Patsy Mink dedicated her life to participating in the democratic process and improving the lives of others.
Marie van Brittan Brown: Creating CCTV in Queens
How did a hardworking nurse from New York City invent the world's first home security system? When a burglar tried to break into her apartment in the 1960s, this kickass crimefighter went where no-one had gone before.
Claudette Colvin: The Original Rosa Parks
You know the story of David and Goliath, right? Well, America has its own version. Only our hero is 15-year-old African-American, school girl Claudette Colvin and in 1955, she took on the State of Alabama for real. The original Rosa Parks!
Linda Brown: The Schoolgirl who Changed America
Linda Brown was just 9-years-old when she was thrust into the national spotlight, as she fought - and won - against racial segregation in the American school system.
Victoria Woodhull: The First Woman To Run for President
Victoria Woodhull ran for President of the United States before most American women were even allowed to vote.
Mercy Otis Warren: Blowing the Whistle on British Rule
Mercy Otis Warren was a poet, playwright and ‘whistleblower’ who used her words to throw some serious shade on British Colonial rule.
Mary Carson Breckinbridge
Mary Carson, born into the wealthy Breckinridge family in 1881, changed the face of US midwifery. This is her story.
Frances Oldham Kelsey: Standing Up to Big Pharma
Meet Frances Oldham Kelsey - a true American hero! Frances was a pharmacologist working for the FDA who stood up to the big drug companies and ultimately saved thousands of American lives in the process.
Mad Ann Bailey: Heroine of the Kanawha Valley
Historic accounts describe her “wild” appearance. So why did English settler Mad Ann Bailey don men’s clothes to take up the fight against Native American tribes?
Jovita Idar: Voice of the People
Imagine throwing shade at a politician online and police showed up to arrest you! It would be un-American, right? In this video, we'll explain the story of Jovita Idar, a Mexican-American journalist who refused to be silenced!
Anna May Wong: Hollywood's First Asian American Movie Star
At a time when racist laws and shameful stereotyping limited the careers of ethnic minority actors, Anna May Wong broke down doors to become the first Chinese American movie star in history!
Breaking Barriers: Constance Baker Motley
Breaking through the limits placed on women and people of color was all in a day’s work for Constance Baker Motley. She was a civil rights activist, lawyer, judge and state senator.
Coverture
Coverture severely restricted women’s political, financial, and personal rights and was imported to the American colonies as a part of English common law. It affected the lives of all American women and although it has been diminished over time vestiges of it remain even today.
Chien-Shiung Wu: The First Lady of Physics
We hear a lot about famous scientists like Marie Curie and Albert Einstein, but have you ever heard of Chien-Shiung Wu and her work on the Manhattan Project?
Thomas(ine) Hall: Gender Non-conforming in Colonial Virginia
Thomas(ine) Hall was a 17th century intersex person who ran afoul of a small community in colonial Virginia.
Negotiating the Surrender of New Netherland
How two wives saved New Amsterdam from total destruction by English invaders through the power of negotiation.
Barbara Jordan: Statement on the Articles of Impeachment
In 1974, US House Representative for Texas, Barbara Jordan delivered an impassioned speech on the power and meaning of the U.S. Constitution. Delivered on primetime television to critical acclaim during the coverage of the infamous Watergate scandal.
Shirley Chisholm: Equal Rights for Women
In 1969 Shirley Chisholm, the first African American Woman elected to Congress spoke to the US House of Representatives to argue in support of a controversial women’s rights bill; the Equal Rights Amendment.
Toypurina: Rebelling Against the Mission System
Toypurina, a Tongva woman who led a rebellion against a Spanish mission in Alta California.
Women's Activism and Social Change
For centuries, women have used activism in the United States to voice their concerns about society and secure their rights as citizens. Activism is an important part of any democracy as it’s the way ordinary people shape nations.
Harriet Robinson Scott: A Personal Fight for Emancipation with National Ramifications
The story of the enslaved woman who challenged slavery in the highest court in the United States.
Catalina Trico: New Netherland's Founding Mother
Catalina Trico was a young trailblazer and the first European mother in what would become New York State.
Elizabeth Freeman: Abolition Pioneer
Elizabeth Freeman played a critical role in the fight to end slavery in the United States.
Malitzen: Enslaved Interpreter for Hernan Cortés
The enslaved Native woman who acted as the primary interpreter for Hernan Cortés during his conquest of the Aztec Empire.
Lorenda Holmes: Loyalist Spy and American Sufferer
Loyalist spy in New York who did everything she could to undermine the American war efforts during the Revolution.
Emma Tenayuca: Latina Labor Activist
Latina labor leader, Emma Tenayuca, led a major food-industry strike in her early 20s and was eventually ostracized for her political beliefs.
Wangarĩ Maathai: Global-Mindedness
Born into a culture where a woman’s place was in the home, Wangarĩ Maathai went onto celebrate a Nobel Peace Prize for her Holistic Approach to Sustainable Development. Let's find out how!
Marsha P. Johnson: Transgender Activist
The story of transgender activist, Marsha P. Johnson, who dedicated her life to LGBTQ+ rights.
Amelia Earhart: Flexibility
Most famously known for being the First Woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, how did Amelia Earhart go from defying traditional gender roles - to defying gravity?
Ida B. Wells: Journalist and Anti-Lynching Activist
Investigative journalist Ida B. Wells made it her mission to exposing the horrors of racism in the American South, but it wasn't easy.
Sojourner Truth: Fierce Warrior for Social Justice
How an enslaved woman became one of the most important social justice activists in American history.
Antonia Pantoja: Grassroots Organizer and Activist
The story of Latina activist Antonia Pantoja, who fought for bilingual education programs.
Frida Kahlo: Self-Awareness
In a time where women struggled to find their voice, Frida was becoming one of the most influential artists of the 20th Century. But how did Kahlo's vibrant art change the world?
Oprah Winfrey: Effective Communication
A captivating storyteller - how did this girl from Mississippi become the most powerful woman that America has known?
Mary Church Terrell: Championing Suffrage and Civil Rights
Mary Church Terrell was a lifelong activist who advocated for suffrage and equal rights.
Fashionable Rebellion: Tignons: From Oppressive Attire to Creative Accoutrement
How free Black women in Spanish Louisiana turned an oppressive headscarf law into a celebration of individuality and culture.
The Windshield Wiper: A Female Innovation
The first mass-produced car in America was basically a lawnmower with leather trim, but it was a start, right? This is the story of Mary Anderson and the Windshield Wiper - an invention that happened by a stroke of fate!
Women of the Civil War
Women weren’t just spectators of the American Civil War – they played a vital role in the home, the workplace, the battlefield and beyond.
Malala Yousafzai: Critical Thinking
Captivated by female innovators, Malala stayed up into the night, imagining the world as fair and united. But how did she change it for the better?
Margaret Mead: Intercultural Knowledge
Mead brought the central insight of cultural anthropology. A master in her discipline – fearless and freethinking – let’s find out how her determination to help others understand, celebrate, and learn from other cultures, made humanity stronger.
The Enslaved Household of Thomas Jefferson
This is the story of Ursula, Edith and Frances – three teenagers who Thomas Jefferson brought to the White House to train as his enslaved personal chefs.
Women in Ancient Athens
The lives and rights of women in Greece, from a modern perspective, seem severely limited; yet, they played important roles in society.
Women of the American Revolution: The Real Unsung Heroes
During the American Revolutionary War some American women disguised themselves as men in order to join the fight, and played a critical role both on the home front and on the battlefield.
The Woman Suffrage Procession
The Women’s Suffrage Procession of 1913 changed how Americans protest – by getting bigger, better and more creative than ever before.
Goal 5: Gender Equality
Short animation explaining UN Sustainable Development Goal 5: Gender Equality for teenage students
The Miss America Protest of 1968
In 1968 – the Miss America beauty pageant became the focus of an audacious protest that helped move feminism forward.
The Battle of the Sexes
Although half of Americans are female, women make up just 25% of Congress. In fact, women have been treated unfairly in America since day one – but what are the causes of that inequality and what are the effects?
How Prostitution Built The Wild West
Putting the "wild" into Wild West, prostitution was big business in frontier communities – and gave the so-called "soiled doves" who controlled the industry wealth and influence as America grew.
Goal 5: Gender Equality
Fifteen year old Natasha explains how young people are taking action on Global Goal 5: Gender Equality
Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities
Short animation explaining UN Sustainable Development Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities for teenage students
Cult of Domesticity
The Cult of Domesticity was a school of thought that women should be confined to the home and aspire to be model wives and mothers. But it wasn’t just men who thought that way, many women did too!
Inspirational Women of the 20th Century
Let’s meet some of the many women who have left a lasting impression on the past century.
Did a Book Spark the Civil War?
It was published nine years before a shot was fired. And was written by a woman. How did Uncle Tom’s Cabin fan the flames of the American Civil War?
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